Womens Hudsons Bay point blanket coat

This vintage coat was made in the 1950s-1960s by the Hudson’s Bay Comapny from their iconic multi-stripe point blankets. This style was produced in the 1950s and 1960s and was joined by and later replaced by a double breasted design. This one has a modified shawl collar and high button stance. It has buttons for the rarely seen and rarely used button-on hood, which is not included with this jacket.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 16″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 31″

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1960s Hudson’s Bay Point Blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271404687198
This vintage coat was made in the early 1960s by the Hudson’s Bay Company from their iconic multi-stripe point blankets. It is their “Olympic” model, a belted, double breasted style with tab adjusters at the wrists, handwarmer pockets at the chest and patch pockets on the hips. The style was made, essentially unchanged, since the 1920s. Whereas some blanket mackinaws of this style were made using the Hudson’s Bay fabric by other manufacturers, this one was made and sold by Hudson’s Bay themselves. This is the same style and era as was worn by the Canadian Olympic team at the 1964 Innsbruck Winter Olympic games. The stripes on this one are inverted from what most are – usually you see the indigo stripe on the bottom. However, even looking at the photos of the Canadian Olympic team all wearing matching versions of this coat, a percentage have this rarer flipped design. The position of the stripes relative to the features of the coats differ in nearly every coat in those pictures as well. I suppose each cutter had their own way of positioning the pattern. The coat is fully lined, which, along with the particular style of label, distinguish it from earlier manufacture coats.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 35″

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1930s Shanhouse Hudson’s Bay Point Blanket Mackinaw Coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281263182073
This vintage mackinaw coat was made around 1936 by W. Shanhouse and Sons of Rockford, Illinois. Shanhouse Sportswear was a well known maker of the time, producing high quality mackinaws, like this one, as well as a variety of leather jackets. At the time, the Hudson’s Bay Point blanket wool option was the most expensive mackinaw available from Shanhouse. Hudson’s Bay blanket wool was prized for its extreme warmth, wind blocking, vibrant color and luxurious nap. This red and black color scheme was probably the most popular, followed by the multi-stripe.

I’ve sold a lot of these blanket mackinaws, and I think this one may be my favorite design so far. It has wide, pointed lapels, with the black stripe positioned underneath for a bit of extra “pop”. This one retains its original hood, attached under the collar with a red knit wool panel for a bit of stretch when worn. The hood spreads when not in use, doing up with a Talon zipper with a rare sunburst bell-shaped puller. Whereas many of these coats had pressed metal buckles, or leather covered ones, this one has a high quality, heavy duty cast buckle. The buttons are original and have a nice red swirl pattern to them. The ones on the sleeves have turned a bit more brown over the years. Instead of regular patch pockets, this one has fancy saddlebag pockets, and uses the red and black of the stripe nicely for contrast.
As is typical on these earlier mackinaws, this one is unlined. The blankets used on these earlier Hudson’s Bay Blanket coats were of much higher quality than later ones, thicker, denser and with a deeper nap. Compare a 1930s coat to a 1970s one and you’ll see what I mean. The points on this coat are located on the side seam. This one features an extra-large version of the Hudson’s Bay label, and a wonderfully designed “Shanhouse” label. The coat bears a United Garment Workers of America “Duck Goods” union label.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 33″

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Gray Blanket stripe coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281262510170
This vintage jacket was made in the 1970s or 1980s. It closely follows the pattern of Hudson’s Bay point blanket jackets of the time, with its shirt style collar and buttoned patch pockets. However, I don’t believe the Hudson’s Bay Company ever produced their jackets in this period with a gray background. I have seen this pattern of fabric made by Woolrich and by Pendleton, so possibly it’s one of theirs.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 21″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 29″

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Canadian army Mackinaw

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271371781839

This vintage mackinaw was made in 1952 for the Canadian army. Stylistically, it is almost identical to civilian Sheeplined mackinaws of the 1920s-1940s. It is, however, made of tougher stuff than most civilian (or US army) mackinaws of this style. The canvas shell is extremely heavy and rugged. The waist belt is much wider than is typical, and is has keeper loops to secure it to the belt loops so that it is not lost, as so often happens. The coat is fully lined in blue green pile, which is less fragile than the sheepskin linings in these can be this many years on. The sleeves are also lined in this material, and have extra long storm cuffs. The coat was made by the Scott Leather Goods Co. of Montreal, and is tagged a size 40.

Tagged size: 40
Chest (pit to pit): 25″ (doubled = 50″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 21″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff):25-1/2″
Length: 36″

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