1940s brown sanforized shorts

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281385081330
These vintage cotton twill shorts were made in the 1940s. They have piped side seams, single pleats, an attached belt, front coin/key pocket and a single rear pocket. They are Sanforized and have a button fly.

Waist (side to side): 18″ (doubled = 36″)
Outseam: 14-1/2″
Inseam: 3-1/2″

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1920s button fly wool men’s bathing suit

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281318827119
This vintage swimsuit was made in the 1920s. it is made from dark blue wool, with a button fly, cotton lined waistband, buttoned, flapped key/coin pocket, and white web belt. This style of swimsuit was popular during the 1920s, and were generally worn with a white knit wool top with a closed “supporter” bottom.

Waist: 16″ (doubled = 32″)
Outseam: 14″ (outwardly sloping legs)
Inseam: 4″
Rise: 12″

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1923

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1924

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1920s men’s wool swimsuit

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271465649111
This vintage swimsuit was made in the 1920s. it is made from dark blue wool, with a button fly, cotton lined waistband, buttoned, and flapped key/coin pocket.. This style of swimsuit was popular during the 1920s, and were generally worn with a white knit wool top with a closed “supporter” bottom.

Waist: 16″ (doubled = 32″)
Outseam: 14-1/2″ (outwardly sloping legs)
Inseam: 6″
Rise: 11″

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1960s does 1920s one-piece swimsuit

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271465674232
This vintage one piece swimsuit was made in the 1960s, part of a short lived revival of 1920s mens swimsuit styles. It is a copy of a one piece 1920s style, with a blue top, striped bottom and a white belt. Unlike the originals, which were made of wool, this one is made of nylon. It was never sold or worn, and still has the original tags. It is tagged a size medium

Waist (unstretched): 14″ (doubled = 28″)
Waist (Stretched): 20″ (doubled = 40″)
Crotch to shoulder, unstretched: 26″
Inseam: 3″
Outseam (from seam between top and bottom): 10″

 

See also: http://vintagehaberdashers.com/2013/07/07/1960s-mens-one-piece-swimsuit/


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1930s Jantzen wool men’s swimsuit

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271465688959
This vintage swimsuit was made by Jantzen and was sold in Brooklyn, New York by the Schwartz Mens Shop. It is the “Half Hitch” model, produced from 1936-1942, recognizable by its tunneled buttonhole belt loop arrangement, narrow belt with hammered look buckle and side piping.

Waist (unstretched): 15″ (doubled =30″)
Waist (stretched): 18″ (doubled =36″)
Side Seam: 9″
Rise: 11-1/2″

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1930s Wool men’s Malibu swimsuit

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271463856636
This vintage swimsuit was made in the late 1930s by Malibu. It is made of burgundy wool, with a false fly and a key/coin pocket with a buttoned, scalloped flap. The sides are double piped with yellow wool, there is a diamond shaped crotch gusset for a more comfortable fit, and the suit has a yellow textured web belt with a fancy buckle. The brand was named after Malibu beach, and advertised it as “The Beach of the Stars”, a clever way to associate itself with the Hollywood elite without necessarily having any of them as endorsers.

Tagged size: 36
Waist (unstretched): 14″ (doubled = 28″)
Waist (Stretched): 21″ (doubled = 42″)
Side seam: 12″
Rise: 15-1/2″

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1930s Milcraft Clothes belted overcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281279971937
This vintage overcoat was made in the mid 1930s by Milcraft Clothes of St. Paul, Minnesota. It is double breasted, with a full belt, patch pockets, cuffed sleeves, a breast pocket, and a fancy yoked, pleated back. As is typical of overcoats of this period, it is half-lined. Unfortunately, there are no union tags or tailor’s tags, but the particular details, style of the Millcraft label, and style and cut of the coat allow for fairly close dating. Pocket square not included.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26-1/2″
Length: 49″

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Californian leather Norfolk Jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281277761040
This vintage leather jacket was made by the California Sportswear Company of Los Angeles, California under the Californian label. It takes heavy stylistic cues from the Norfolk jackets of the 1910s and 1920s. The jacket has two breast pocket flaps with chest pleats, a full attached belt, flapped hip pockets, and a pleated back with a scaloped yoke. The jacket is fully lined.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 29″

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WWII Doeskin Army Mackinaw

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271371265923
This vintage army mackinaw was made in 1942. It is made of doeskin wool in a double breasted, shawl collared, belted mackinaw style. The spec tag identifies the official name as the Officer’s Short Overcoat, and the size as a 38 Long. One of the buttons on the belt is missing, but replacements for this model coat are easily found.

Chest (pit to pit): 21-1/2″
Shoulder to shoulder: 19-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length: 34″

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Mid 1940s Albert Richard leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271352480738
This vintage leather jacket was made by Albert Richard in the mid 1940s. It is made of “Chevro-Kid” goatskin. This trade name was typical of Albert Richards’s naming schemes during WWII and shortly after, playing of military terminology. The company could back this up- they produced flight jackets for the army and navy during the war. This jacket is made of the same goatskin used for these Navy flight jacket contracts. The jacket is a hip length style, with flapped saddlebag patch pockets , a straight yoke on the front, and a plain back. It was originally belted, but as with many jackets of this style, the belt is long since missing. The zipper is a Talon, with a mid 1940s stopbox and a slightly earlier style slider (these combinations were common at this period). The zipper is attached in the “surcoat” style, , where the end of the zip is attached to a triangle of leather which is free from the front of the jacket.

Chest (pit to pit): 21-1/2″ (doubled = 43″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″
Length: 29-1/2″

A bit about Albert Richard, from an article I wrote for “The Art of Vintage Leather Jackets”.
Fried-Ostermann was founded c.1902 as a glove manufacturer. They bought out their competitor, Price Gloves, and relocated production of that company’s products to their original factory, located at 617-645 Reed Street, Milwaukee, WI. By 1915, the company had gained a partner, and was known as the Fried, Ostermann, Meyer Co, but that looks to only have lasted until 1917. As the company grew, they relocated to 1645 S. 2nd Street, Milwaukee, WI. Fried-Ostermann diversified out of gloves and into outerwear in the late 1920s with the formation of a new division of the company, called Albert Richard. The leather jackets, mackinaws, overcoats and sportswear produced by Albert Richard would soon come to eclipse the glove-making side of the company. Pre-war advertising stressed health and sports, with endorsements from college football players. These ads also talk about bringing items of clothing which were previously thought of as workwear, like mackinaws and leather jackets, into the realm of ordinary streetwear, citing their comfort and durability.
During WWII, the Albert Richard factory made A-2 (contract AC 23383), M-422A (contract 1406A), M444A and M445A flight jackets under the name of their parent company, Fried-Ostermann. They advertised leather jackets, overcoats and sportswear heavily during WWII, giving their jackets model names like the “Spitfire” and the “Meteor”. During the war, the company gave away wall-sized posters showing a range of american military airplanes. 850 workers were employed by Albert r in 1946, with plans to hire another 400. The company was one of the first to use fiberglass insulation in coats, a technology borrowed from b-29 bombers. Sheepskin collared “storm coats” became a signature model after the war.
President of Fried-Ostermann, Richard Fried, sold their Albert Richard Division to the Drybak corporation of Binghampton, NY in late 1952. Drybak, a maker of canvas hunting clothing was looking to diversify their line. In the deal, they got the licensing, branding, patterns, dealership network, but other than the Vice President and designer for Albert Richard, all of the employees and equipment stayed at the plant in Milwaukee. Fried-Osterman re-focused the attention of their plant on the production of gloves, and on producing leather jackets under house labels for mail order and department stores.
Starting in 1953, under Drybak’s ownership, Albert Richard clothing was once again produced, this time under contract at a factory in New Jersey, which Drybak declined to name. The plan at that time was to have production moved to New York by 1954. Labels were changed in this period to read “Albert Richard by Drybak”. In 1955, Drybak acquired the Martin Mfg. Co. in Martin, TN. They closed their Binghamton operations in that same year and relocated their hunting clothing manufacturing and their Albert Richard division to the Tennessee plant to take advantage of the lower labor costs in the south. Production was low, and this new plant closed almost as soon as it opened.

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