1940s Civilian B-2 leather flight jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281645136149
This vintage jacket was made in Kansas City, Missouri, as a civilian version of the US army B-2 Flight jacket, issued in the early 1930s, and replaced by the B-3 in 1934. The army version was made of horsehide, with a single breast pocket, attached belt zippered cuffs on the inside of the wrist, and a full alpaca lining and mouton collar. This jacket was produced with a civilian label and a few alterations to the pattern. This jacket is made from capeskin, and with handwarmer pockets instead the large breast patch pocket that was universally removed from the army production version. This jacket has an off-center Talon main zipper, with bell-shaped slider and unmarked diagonal-stripe sunburst stopbox. The sleeves have zipper cuffs, with early pattern United Carr snaps and bell shaped talon zippers. The jacket has heavy wear, and the label has been partially worn away. The remaining text reads “aviation” and “Kansas City Mo”. There is a remnant of what looks to be a wing logo. The size tag is of the black and yellow design used on military jackets, and the pocket linings are the distinctive shade of twill used in the linings of A-2 jackets. These details point to this jacket having been made as part of a specialized civilian aviator’s line by a manufacturer which held a military jacket contract.

Chest (pit to pit): 21-1/2″ (doubled = 43″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 16″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 22″

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1940s C.C. Filson cruiser jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281644238181
This vintage jacket was union made in Seattle Washington by the C.C. Filson Company. It is made of black and white buffalo plaid in their classic cruiser pattern. It has four main pockets, with side access to the game pouch, and two sub-pockets, one slotted and the other for a watch or cigarettes. The coat is double layered wool for the game pouch. This jacket features the early style diamond label, and early style United Carr snaps, with the printed “C.C. Filson Co Manufacturers Seattle” design, before they switched over to the later metal topped version with their name cast in. The cuffs have at some point been reinforced or lengthened with black leather, and there is a patch on the sleeve.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 28-1/2″

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1950s Penney’s Sportclad gabardine jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281644153631
This vintage jacket was made in the early 1950s for Penney’s under the Sportclad label. It is made of khaki colored wool gabardine, with elastic side panels for a neat silhouette, an evolution of the half-belt and side adjuster buckes of 1930s jackets of a similar style. The jacket has a Talon zipper, with the deep grooved, unmarked U shaped stop box which was used in the early 1950s.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″
Length (base of collar to hem): 24-3/8″

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1930s-early 1940s Bond double breasted overcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271820455903
This vintage overcoat was made in the 1930s-early 1940s by Bond Clothes. It is made of black herringbone wool, is double breasted, with wide peaked lapels and a breast pocket. The coat is fully lined, and bears either a 1936 or 1939 Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America Union label.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 40″

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1940s Maine Guide Hudson’s Bay point blanket mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271813450865
This vintage coat was made in the USA by Congress under the Maine Guide Sportswear label. It is made from English-made Hudson’s Bay point blanket material, one of the highest quality and most expensive wools on the market for this type of coat at that point. These coats were most popular in red and black stripe, and in multi-stripe (green red, yellow and indigo stripes on a white background).

The style of the Hudson’s Bay label and the (R) symbol on the Maine Guide label help to date this to the late 1940s, although the overall pattern of the coat belongs more to the 1930s. There were two major waves of Hudson’s Bay Point Blanket mackinaw popularity, one in the mid 1930s and one immediately after WWII. The ones from the 1940s period to which this one belongs were generally beltless and single breasted, whereas this fits the traditional mackinaw mold of the 1920s and 1930s, but with a bit more flair. I like the way the Maine Guide coats use the pattern of the blanket to accentuate the details of their coats. The “points” of the blanket are right up front. The sleeves are defined by the stripe, as are the handwarmer pockets and the buttoned sleeve adjuster belts. The hip pocket flaps contrast against the main stripe. Some manufacturers of point blanket coats merely tailored their standard mackinaw pattern in a different material. Maine Guide went the extra step to take full advantage of everything the iconic Canadian fabric had to offer. The blanket wool is thick and has a long nap, which is also more typical of earlier production blankets than those found on coats dating from the 1950s-present, after manufacturing was switched from England to Canada. It makes sense, as the company had a lot of experience with blanket coats. In the early 1930s, Maine Guide produced a model with a double breasted chest and a zippered bottom. A really unique look.

This coat is double breasted and belted, and has stylish peak lapels and a rounded collar which I have only seen on blanket coats made by Maine Guide. Another unique feature to Maine Guide is the bottom hem, which uses the edge of the blanket, instead of having a bottom seam. The coat is unlined, which is more typical of pre-war patterns.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″
(doubled = 46″) Shoulder to shoulder: 20-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/4″
Length (base of collar to hem): 35″

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A progression of Hudson’s Bay labels.  This one is a variant of one used from the mid 1930s-1950s

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1946 Albert Richard Spun Sun plaid coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281635072000
This vintage coat was made by Albert Richard in Milwaukee, Wisconsin in 1946. It is interlined with “Spun Sun” fiberglass insulation, pioneered by Albert Richard immediately after WWII. This model can be seen in the advertisement below. This is the early style “Spun Sun” fabric, before the introduction of the (R) symbol in 1947. Albert Richard was sold and relocated in 1952, closing shortly thereafter. This coat has a three button front, a broad collar and two flapped hip pockets.

Tagged size: 44
Chest (pit to pit): 25″ (doubled = 50″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 31″

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1940s Shanhouse Bold Look two-tone mackinaw jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281632150114
This vintage coat was made in 1947-1948 by Shanhouse Bros of Rockford, Illinois. This coat was featured in their “Bold Look” advertising campaign, and has a brick red blanket wool body with contrasting trim, sleeves and caped shoulders in red and white plaid. As is typical of mackinaws of this era, it is unlined, save for the shoulders. The jacket has a Talon zipper, with a U shaped Talon marked stopbox that was produced in the late 1940s.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 30″

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