1940s Albert Richard Horsehide bomber jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281606438407
This vintage jacket was made in the late 1940s by Fried-Ostermann under their Albert Richard Sportswear label. It is made of brown leather, which, though not labeled on the jacket as such, is called out in advertisements for this model as “Superior horsehide”. The jacket has a mouton collar, called “beavertex” by Albert Richard ads, handwarmer pockets and a zipped breast pocket. The main zipper is a Talon of mid 1940s manufacture, with a square cornered slider and Talon marked U shaped stopbox.
Chest (pit to pit): 20-1/2″ (doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-1/2″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 23-1/2″

A bit on the history of Albert Richard:
Fried-Ostermann was founded c.1902 as a glove manufacturer. They bought out their competitor, Price Gloves, and relocated production of that company’s products to their original factory, located at 617-645 Reed Street, Milwaukee, WI. By 1915, the company had gained a partner, and was known as the Fried, Ostermann, Meyer Co, but that looks to only have lasted until 1917. As the company grew, they relocated to 1645 S. 2nd Street, Milwaukee, WI. Fried-Ostermann diversified out of gloves and into outerwear in the late 1920s with the formation of a new division of the company, called Albert Richard. The leather jackets, mackinaws, overcoats and sportswear produced by Albert Richard would soon come to eclipse the glove-making side of the company. Pre-war advertising stressed health and sports, with endorsements from college football players. These ads also talk about bringing items of clothing which were previously thought of as workwear, like mackinaws and leather jackets, into the realm of ordinary streetwear, citing their comfort and durability. During WWII, the Albert Richard factory made A-2 (contract AC 23383), M-422A (contract 1406A), M444A and M445A flight jackets under the name of their parent company, Fried-Ostermann. They advertised leather jackets, overcoats and sportswear heavily during WWII, giving their jackets model names like the “Spitfire” and the “Meteor”. During the war, the company gave away wall-sized posters showing a range of american military airplanes. 850 workers were employed by Albert Richard in 1946, with plans to hire another 400. The company was one of the first to use fiberglass insulation in coats, a technology borrowed from b-29 bombers. Sheepskin collared “storm coats” became a signature model after the war. President of Fried-Ostermann, Richard Fried, sold their Albert Richard Division to the Drybak corporation of Binghampton, NY in late 1952. Drybak, a maker of canvas hunting clothing was looking to diversify their line. In the deal, they got the licensing, branding, patterns, dealership network, but other than the Vice President and designer for Albert Richard, all of the employees and equipment stayed at the plant in Milwaukee. Fried-Osterman re-focused the attention of their plant on the production of gloves, and on producing leather jackets under house labels for mail order and department stores. Starting in 1953, under Drybak’s ownership, Albert Richard clothing was once again produced, this time under contract at a factory in New Jersey, which Drybak declined to name. The plan at that time was to have production moved to New York by 1954. Labels were changed in this period to read “Albert Richard by Drybak”. In 1955, Drybak acquired the Martin Mfg. Co. in Martin, TN. They closed their Binghamton operations in that same year and relocated their hunting clothing manufacturing and their Albert Richard division to the Tennessee plant to take advantage of the lower labor costs in the south.

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1930s-1940s ClothCraft blue tweed overcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271782685344
This vintage overcoat was made in the late 1930s-early 1940s by Clothcraft for the Standard Clothing Company of Williston, North Dakota. It bears an Amalgamated Clothing Workers of America union label, though the way it is sewn, you can’t see whether it is a 1936 or 1939 variant. My guess would be a ’39. The coat is double breasted, with handwarmer pockets. It is made of a heavy blue tweed. The coat is half-lined, as was typical during this period.
Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 16″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/2″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 45″

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1940s gabardine half-belt jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271783149533
This vintage jacket was made in the mid-late 1940s. It is gabardine, made in a waist length utility jacket style, with a half-belt back with a center pleat, straight yoke and side adjuster buckles. The jacket has a Talon main zipper, with a square cornered slider and U shaped Talon stopbox, which was produced in the immediate post-war years. The jacket is fully lined, and does not have a label.

Chest (pit to pit): 21-1/2″ (doubled = 43″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 24-1/2″

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1940s Dureghan Longwear overcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281595208004
This vintage overcoat was made in the 1940s by the New Process Company of Warren, Pennsylvania under the LongWear label of Dureghan 100% Wool fabric, with a luxurious nap. It is single breasted and half-lined.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18-1.2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 44″

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1940s Hercules mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271772745793
This vintage mackinaw coat was made in the early 1940s for Sears under its Hercules label. It is wool plaid in a double breasted cut, with handwarmer pockets and flapped cargo pockets. It has a plaid lining, a feature Sears introduced in its mackinaws around 1941. By the post-war period, many mackinaws sold by Sears had switched over to a quilted lining, and the design of the Hercules label had changed.

Chest (pit to pit): 26″ (doubled = 52″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 21″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 31″

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1930s German sleeved leather vest

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281596561896
This vintage jacket is made in a sleeved waistcoat style, with a five button front, turnback lapels, and four flapped pockets. It has a belted back and snap cuffs. The style of snaps used are typical of German manufactured leather jackets. It is fully lined, and is tagged a German size 54, which is equivalent to a US size 44. With a 45″ chest, I would say this would best fit a size 40-42

Chest (pit to pit): 22-1/2″ (doubled =45″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 27″
Length (base of collar to hem): 21″

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1940s Saddle Sturdy Brand gabardine jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281601299399
This vintage jacket was made in the late 1940s by Glenshore of Denver, Colorado under their Saddle Sturdy Brand label. It is made of wool gabardine, in a western flavored waist length utility jacket style. It has curving seams front and back, well integrated handwarmer and breast pockets, side adjuster tabs and a long collar. It has a zipper front with a no. 3 Talon zipper, with a squared corner slider with rectangular hole, and unmarked wide rib stopbox, which help nail down the late 1940s date.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″
Shoulder to shoulder: 17″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-1/2″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 24″

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