1930s Brewster Mackinaw

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281303524987
This vintage mackinaw coat was made in Camden, Maine by the J.A. Brewster company. The company was founded in the 19th century by Jarvis Adelbert Brewster. The company produced high quality outerwear for the harsh Maine winters, with locations in Camden and Freeport Maine. The LL Bean flagship store would later be built at the site of Brewster’s Freeport location. Brewster produced the first run of red wool outdoorsman’s shirts for the Boy Scouts in the 1940s.

This coat was made in the late 1930s. The style is pure function, with an oversized collar to block out harsh winter winds. A throat latch / chinstrap makes sure it stays snug when up. The coat is double breasted, with handwarmer pockets on the chest and patch pockets on the hips. As was the style up through the 1930s, this coat is unlined. To make up for the lack of lining and still retain warmth, these early coats were made of super thick wool. After WWII, when lighter weight coats began to be more popular, quilted linings made up for the lower quality of the shell. This one has some of the thickest wool I’ve seen on this type of coat. The tag position is consistent with the dating- later coats by this maker generally had the tag on the inside by the collar.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (collar to hem): 30″

 photo IMG_0387.jpg

 photo IMG_0392.jpg

 photo IMG_0388.jpg

 photo IMG_0390.jpg

 photo IMG_0391.jpg

 photo IMG_0070.jpg

 photo IMG_0071.jpg

1930s Big Yank chinstrap workshirt

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271435207029
This vintage workshirt was made by famed workwear manufacturer, Big Yank, in the 1930s. The shirt has an extended, double button collar stand, now known as a chinstrap. There are two spacious, flapped breast pockets. Seams are triple stitched. Shoulders are reinforced, as are the elbows. The tails are gusseted. The blue chambray versions of this style were popular in the summer, while wool versions, like this one, were worn in the winter. There is the remains of a Dewitt Clinton Cigarette tax stamp in one of the pockets, possibly series 108 from 1938

Tagged size: 16-1/2
Collar: 16-1/2″
Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-3/4″
Length (base of collar to hem): 29-1/2″

 photo IMG_0213.jpg

 photo IMG_0209.jpg

 photo IMG_0210.jpg

 photo IMG_0212.jpg

 photo IMG_0214.jpg

 photo IMG_0216.jpg

 photo IMG_0217.jpg

 photo IMG_0218.jpg

 photo IMG_0220.jpg

 photo IMG_0221.jpg

 photo IMG_0222.jpg

 photo IMG_0223.jpg

 photo 192201.jpg

 photo 192301.jpg

 photo 192801.jpg

 photo 05.jpg

WWI US Navy Peacoat repro

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271423315528
This peacoat was made by Ralph Lauren and is a reproduction of the model worn in WWI. It has a ten button front, with both handwarmer and flapped cargo pockets. There is a short vent in the rear. The pockets are lined in corduroy. Buttons are reproductions of the 13 star buttons used on WWI coats, with the addition of the RL. The coat is fully lined, with two interior pockets.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length: 32″

 photo IMG_0003-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0004-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0005-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0006-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0008.jpg

 photo IMG_0012-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0013-1.jpg

Early 1930s Woolrich 503 Mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271423336178
This vintage hunting coat was made in Woolrich, Pennsylvania in the early 1930s by John Rich / Woolrich Woolen Mills. The 503 style hunting coat as been around with relatively few changes for the better part of a century, but the details make it easy to date. This is the earliest version of this coat I have seen.

While many Woolrich labels look relatively similar in isolation, the company changed their design every few years. This label was used in the very early 1930s. See the dating guide I have put together at the end of the auction. The snaps in this coat are by United Carr, and are a design only used from about 1930-1934. The top of the snap, with its line design, was used by Woolrich until about 1940. They switched to plain headed snaps during WWII, then to Woolrich branded snaps after the war. These early coats have asymmetrical breast pockets, while starting in the late 1950s, Woolrich switched to matching breast pockets. The brown buttons on this early coat are nicer than the red bakelite buttons which Woolrich began to use in the mid 1930s, which has a tendency to craze and crack over time.

Chest (pit to pit): 25″
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 28″

 photo IMG_0014-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0016-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0030.jpg

 photo IMG_0031.jpg

 photo IMG_0017-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0023-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0025-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0033-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0034-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0035-1.jpg

 photo sheep.jpg

 photo snaps.jpg

1920s hookless zipper front pullover Hudson’s Bay jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271422243118
This vintage jacket was made in the 1920s. It was tailored from Hudson’s Bay point blanket material, at the time, one of the most expensive wools on the market, prized for its warmth and vibrant colors.
The jacket is a pullover style, with an A-1 style knit waistband. The separable-bottomed zipper was not introduced by Hookless/Talon until 1930. Prior to that point, if a manufacturer wanted a zip-front to a jacket, it had to be closed-bottomed, which meant a pullover style. This zipper is an extremely rare early Hookless, dating to the 1920s. It has a bent wire pull, probably meant for a leather pull attachment. This design pre-dated the grommet-zipper by a good five years or more.
It has a shirt style collar, with a long chinstrap, a detail borrowed from work clothing. The opening of the zipper has a layer of wool behind it to keep anything from becoming snagged in the teeth of the zipper. The Hudson’s Bay Company label bears the logo used in the 1920s, pre-dating the inclusion of registration numbers in the late 1920s.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 21″ (Replacement of missing cuffs would probably bring length to 24-25″)
Length: 27″

 photo IMG_0119.jpg

 photo IMG_0120.jpg

 photo IMG_0001.jpg

 photo IMG_0121.jpg

 photo IMG_0123.jpg

 photo IMG_0125.jpg

 photo IMG_0131.jpg

 photo IMG_0126.jpg

 photo IMG_0133.jpg

 photo IMG_0128.jpg

 photo IMG_0130.jpg

1930s Red Head half moon hunting / fishing vest

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271420560900
This vest was made in the 1930s by Red Head Brand and was sold by the R.S. Elliott Arms Co. of Kansas City, MO. This style has come to be known as a half-moon hunting vest, after its pass through pocket. Period advertisements generally referred to this style as a sleeveless jacket rather than as a vest. This one has pleated, flapped patch pockets on the front and back, as well as two patch pockets on the lining. The half-moons pass through to the roomy internal game pocket, which closes with a button.

Chest (pit to pit): 22-1/2″ (doubled = 45″)
Length: 27″

 photo IMG_0137.jpg

 photo IMG_0138.jpg

 photo IMG_0140.jpg

 photo IMG_0141.jpg

 photo IMG_0150.jpg

 photo IMG_0149.jpg

 photo IMG_0147.jpg

 photo IMG_0151.jpg

 photo IMG_0152.jpg

 photo IMG_0146.jpg

 photo IMG_0144.jpg

 photo IMG_0142.jpg

 photo IMG_0148.jpg

1920s Canvasback hunting vest

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271420576862
This vintage hunting vest was made in the 1920s by Canvasback It is an early, high buttoning style, with 54 closed-bottomed canvas shotgun shell pockets. The bottom tier of pockets loops all the way around the back and sides of the vest. The label is worn, but has a great graphic of a canvasback duck, with the slogan, “King Of Them All”.

Chest (pit to pit): 18-1/2″
Length: 18″

 photo IMG_0153.jpg

 photo IMG_0154.jpg

 photo IMG_0156.jpg

 photo IMG_0155.jpg

1930s – 1940s Hercules sheeplined work vest

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271418501090
This vintage work vest was sold by Sears under their Hercules workwear label in the late 1930s or early 1940s. It predates the (R) on the label which would come after WWII. It has a high necked cut favored by work vests due to the greater warmth and protection it offered. The vest has two pockets and a full sheepskin lining. Construction and materials are similar to the shawl collared sheepskin mackinaws sold by Hercules at the same period.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″
Length: 22″

 photo IMG_0106.jpg

 photo IMG_0109.jpg

 photo IMG_0114.jpg

 photo IMG_0112.jpg

 photo IMG_0113.jpg

 photo IMG_0117.jpg

 photo IMG_0118.jpg

1930s Milcraft Clothes belted overcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281279971937
This vintage overcoat was made in the mid 1930s by Milcraft Clothes of St. Paul, Minnesota. It is double breasted, with a full belt, patch pockets, cuffed sleeves, a breast pocket, and a fancy yoked, pleated back. As is typical of overcoats of this period, it is half-lined. Unfortunately, there are no union tags or tailor’s tags, but the particular details, style of the Millcraft label, and style and cut of the coat allow for fairly close dating. Pocket square not included.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26-1/2″
Length: 49″

 photo IMG_0088.jpg

 photo IMG_0089.jpg

 photo IMG_0091.jpg

 photo IMG_0093.jpg

 photo IMG_0098.jpg

 photo IMG_0099.jpg

 photo IMG_0100.jpg

 photo IMG_0103.jpg

 photo IMG_0104.jpg

 photo IMG_0102.jpg

1930s Work Breeches 33 Waist

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281277698624
These vintage breeches were made in the 1920s and 1930s and were obviously worn for heavy work. They are made from heavy cotton material, in a lace legged breech style. They have a button fly. The legs have been reinforced with two layers of heavy roughout leather. Other holes, including one in the leg, and one in the crotch, have been patched with what looks like army khaki twill.

Waist: 16-1/2″ (doubled = 33″)
Inseam: 24″
Outseam: 36″
Rise: 12″

 photo IMG_0061.jpg

 photo IMG_0062.jpg

 photo IMG_0064.jpg

 photo IMG_0065.jpg