1960s Harley Davidson leather pants

These vintage pants were made in the 1960s for Harley-Davidson. They are made of heavyweight black leather with an absolutely killer grain. They have a double snap waistband, heavy jacket size Conmar zipper fly and diamond pull zipper pockets.

Waist (side to side): 19″ (doubled = 38″)
Outseam: 47-1/2″
Inseam: 35″
Rise: 12-1/2″

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Levis LVC 1933 501XX jeans reproduction review

I bought these Levis LVC 1933 501XX jeans in December of 2012.  They’re made from denim from the Cone Mills and were made in Turkey. A little over two and a half years on, they’re still hanging on, barely.  I’ve worn them pretty hard in that time.  In the wood shop, metal shop, while doing construction, while building architectural models, etc.  So they’ve had a rough life.  That said, they’ve still worn out faster than any other pair of jeans I have owned.  They’ve worn through in the crotch, knees, thighs and seat.  A rivet fell out of the pocket fairly early on, the stitching has come undone on about half of the pocket accurate, and there are many spots worn so thin that I’m sure another round of patches is due before too long.  photo Levis.jpg

1930s Western Costume Company Hollywood fringed buckskin pants

These vintage buckskin pants were made in the 1930s, or possibly earlier. They were used by the Western Costume Company of Hollywood California in western movies starting in the 1930s. They are made of buckskin leather, rough side out, with fronge running the length of the outseam. They have one pocket, on the right seam, have a button fly and belt loops. There is a stain on the right leg and on the pocket bag. The main tag has them marked as a size 32×32, but they have been taken in and shortened over the decades, as these were used in countless movies. The main tag has number 38-23_5-2. If the illegible number is a 4, that number, 2345 was the production number for 1936’s The Last of the Mohicans, starring Randolph Scott, in which he wore an identical looking pair of buckskin pants, and in which other characters wore many fringed buckskin costume pieces.

Waist (side to side): 15″ (doubled = 30″)
Outseam: 36″
Inseam: 25″
Rise: 11″

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1940s brown sanforized shorts

These vintage cotton twill shorts were made in the 1940s. They have piped side seams, single pleats, an attached belt, front coin/key pocket and a single rear pocket. They are Sanforized and have a button fly.

Waist (side to side): 18″ (doubled = 36″)
Outseam: 14-1/2″
Inseam: 3-1/2″

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1930s Black Bear Rain-Tite canvas suit

This vintage suit was made in the 1930s in Seattle, Washington by high end workwear and outdoor-garment manufacturer Black Bear Brand as part of their “Rain-Tite” water repellent clothes range. Black Bear Brand produced work shirts, pants, overalls, jackets and mackinaws from their plant on Rainier Ave. S. This suit is made from army duck canvas, the jacket from 10oz duck and the pants from 8 oz duck. It appears they both started out life a medium brown canvas, but years of wear and layers of waterproofing have darkened it. Both are extremely heavy duty, and are physically heavy and stiff, both from the material and from the wax proofing. The back of the jacket is two layers of the 10 oz canvas through the body, with three layers on the shoulders. The sleeves are two layers. It is constructed with overlapping capes and layers to keep everything dry in harsh weather. The pants are two layers as well. They are cut to be worn with tall boots. They have suspender buttons and belt loops. There is a crotch gusset, and a patch watch pocket inside the side pocket.

In the pocket of the pants, I found the package of a trolling spoon and an Elks matchbook advertising war bonds. This suit probably hasn’t been worn in a good 70 years or so if those are still in-tact in the pocket. The snaps are all branded “Union Made” as are all the buttons. There are union tags from the United Garment Workers of America inside the jacket and inside the flap of the back pocket of the pants. The waterproofing is still good- water beads up and falls right off. This type of suit was frequently worn by lumbermen in the North West. The heavy wear supports this. Going by the matchbook, the original owner of this one was probably from Vancouver.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″ (doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to shoulder (under cape): 22″
Sleeve (Shoulder to cuff): 20″
Length (base of collar to hem): 28-1/2″

Waist: 17″ (doubled = 34″)
Inseam: 25″
Outseam: 38″
Rise: 13″

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A similar suit in the 1920s in Alaska.  Photo from my collection  photo 102.jpg

1930s Work Breeches 33 Waist

These vintage breeches were made in the 1920s and 1930s and were obviously worn for heavy work. They are made from heavy cotton material, in a lace legged breech style. They have a button fly. The legs have been reinforced with two layers of heavy roughout leather. Other holes, including one in the leg, and one in the crotch, have been patched with what looks like army khaki twill.

Waist: 16-1/2″ (doubled = 33″)
Inseam: 24″
Outseam: 36″
Rise: 12″

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