1960s Suede Trucker Jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281298801105
This vintage suede leather jacket was made in the 1960s or 1970s. It is made in a two pocket trucker style- the leather version of a classic denim jacket. It is snap front and unlined.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 23″

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Californian leather Norfolk Jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281277761040
This vintage leather jacket was made by the California Sportswear Company of Los Angeles, California under the Californian label. It takes heavy stylistic cues from the Norfolk jackets of the 1910s and 1920s. The jacket has two breast pocket flaps with chest pleats, a full attached belt, flapped hip pockets, and a pleated back with a scaloped yoke. The jacket is fully lined.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 29″

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Rio Algom Mine Rescue leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271416118834
This leather jacket was made in the 1980s by Bristol Leather and Sportswear company of Montreal, Canada. It bears a patch of the Rio Algom mining company, who owned and operated Uranium mines through Canada. The patch is for the Rio Algom Mine Rescue squad, and has an image of a miner wearing a hard hat.

Chest (pit to pit): 23-1/2″ (doubled = 47″)
Sleeve (center of collar to cuff: 34″
Length (base of collar to hem): 24″

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1930s Grommet Zipper half-belt leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281272035995
This vintage leather jacket was made in the mid 1930s. It is made from capeskin leather, rough side out. As was typical of these early-mid 1930s lightweight half-belt windbreaker styles, this one is unlined. It has an riveted “grommet” Talon zipper, a style which was produced from the early-mid 1930s, before being joined, then replaced by the deco “sunburst” style stopbox. The slider is an early style, with rays on the slider, a small hole puller, and an attachment section which is more oval shaped than those produced later in the 1930s. The jacket is a waist length Cossack style, and has a fancy pleated, belted back with side adjuster belts.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″
Shoulder to shoulder: 16-3/4″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 21″

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1950s Deerskin leather half-belt jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281263966868
This vintage leather jacket was made from deerskin, probably in the late 1950s or 1960s. I have had this exact pattern of jacket before, but with a zipper front instead of the button front which this one sports. The other one had a mid 1950s Conmar zipper. However, many of these small deerskin jacket tailors kept the same exact pattern for years, so it could well go into the 1960s. With that said, it’s a button front, surcoat length halfbelt. It has slash handwarmer pockets and flapped cargo pockets, and has two zipper closure pockets on the chest. The back has a subtly western scalloped yoke and a half-belt.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″
Shoulder to shoulder: 18-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length: 31-1/2″

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Fringed suede leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271378703217
This vintage leather jacket was custom tailored in Hong Kong by James S. Lee & Co, Ltd. for Lawrence J Gintner. It was probably made in the 1970s, and is brown suede, in a mod double breasted cut with ticket pocket. The back yoke and sleeves are fringed. The jacket has a blue and brown paisley lining. It has double vents.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″
Length: 27-1/2″

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c.1946 half-belt leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281248820993
This vintage leather jacket was made immediately post-war, around 1946 or 1947. It feels like horsehide, but without a label to confirm, it’s possible that it’s steer. It has square yoked shoulders, handwarmer pockets on the chest, and flapped pockets on the hips. The back has a half-belt and pleats. The zipper is a Talon of the type used just after the war, with a pre-war style “small hole” pull tab and a U-shaped stop box stamped with the Talon name. The makers tag is long gone, but the original owner’s name, John Meinel, has been sewn into the lining by the collar.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 27″

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1950s Brent halfbelt leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281243867632

This vintage leather jacket was made in the 1950s by Brent, a house brand of Montgomery Ward. It is a heavy leather, probably steerhide, but possibly horsehide- without a label it’s hard to be positive. The jacket has a half-belt back and a slanted zipper closure breast pocket. Zippers are by Conmar. The jacket has a quilted lining and storm cuffs.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length: 30″

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Mid 1940s Albert Richard leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271352480738
This vintage leather jacket was made by Albert Richard in the mid 1940s. It is made of “Chevro-Kid” goatskin. This trade name was typical of Albert Richards’s naming schemes during WWII and shortly after, playing of military terminology. The company could back this up- they produced flight jackets for the army and navy during the war. This jacket is made of the same goatskin used for these Navy flight jacket contracts. The jacket is a hip length style, with flapped saddlebag patch pockets , a straight yoke on the front, and a plain back. It was originally belted, but as with many jackets of this style, the belt is long since missing. The zipper is a Talon, with a mid 1940s stopbox and a slightly earlier style slider (these combinations were common at this period). The zipper is attached in the “surcoat” style, , where the end of the zip is attached to a triangle of leather which is free from the front of the jacket.

Chest (pit to pit): 21-1/2″ (doubled = 43″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″
Length: 29-1/2″

A bit about Albert Richard, from an article I wrote for “The Art of Vintage Leather Jackets”.
Fried-Ostermann was founded c.1902 as a glove manufacturer. They bought out their competitor, Price Gloves, and relocated production of that company’s products to their original factory, located at 617-645 Reed Street, Milwaukee, WI. By 1915, the company had gained a partner, and was known as the Fried, Ostermann, Meyer Co, but that looks to only have lasted until 1917. As the company grew, they relocated to 1645 S. 2nd Street, Milwaukee, WI. Fried-Ostermann diversified out of gloves and into outerwear in the late 1920s with the formation of a new division of the company, called Albert Richard. The leather jackets, mackinaws, overcoats and sportswear produced by Albert Richard would soon come to eclipse the glove-making side of the company. Pre-war advertising stressed health and sports, with endorsements from college football players. These ads also talk about bringing items of clothing which were previously thought of as workwear, like mackinaws and leather jackets, into the realm of ordinary streetwear, citing their comfort and durability.
During WWII, the Albert Richard factory made A-2 (contract AC 23383), M-422A (contract 1406A), M444A and M445A flight jackets under the name of their parent company, Fried-Ostermann. They advertised leather jackets, overcoats and sportswear heavily during WWII, giving their jackets model names like the “Spitfire” and the “Meteor”. During the war, the company gave away wall-sized posters showing a range of american military airplanes. 850 workers were employed by Albert r in 1946, with plans to hire another 400. The company was one of the first to use fiberglass insulation in coats, a technology borrowed from b-29 bombers. Sheepskin collared “storm coats” became a signature model after the war.
President of Fried-Ostermann, Richard Fried, sold their Albert Richard Division to the Drybak corporation of Binghampton, NY in late 1952. Drybak, a maker of canvas hunting clothing was looking to diversify their line. In the deal, they got the licensing, branding, patterns, dealership network, but other than the Vice President and designer for Albert Richard, all of the employees and equipment stayed at the plant in Milwaukee. Fried-Osterman re-focused the attention of their plant on the production of gloves, and on producing leather jackets under house labels for mail order and department stores.
Starting in 1953, under Drybak’s ownership, Albert Richard clothing was once again produced, this time under contract at a factory in New Jersey, which Drybak declined to name. The plan at that time was to have production moved to New York by 1954. Labels were changed in this period to read “Albert Richard by Drybak”. In 1955, Drybak acquired the Martin Mfg. Co. in Martin, TN. They closed their Binghamton operations in that same year and relocated their hunting clothing manufacturing and their Albert Richard division to the Tennessee plant to take advantage of the lower labor costs in the south. Production was low, and this new plant closed almost as soon as it opened.

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Sears Oakbrook D-Pocket leather motorcycle jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271351691584

This vintage leather jacket was made in the 1960s by Sears under the Oakbrook Sportswear tag. This style was around for a while, with very little change made other than the label and zippers. 1950s models made under the Sears Fieldmaster label. It is made of black steerhide. It has a large D-Pocket (also known as a pistol pocket), with a smaller cigarette pocket. The other side has a zippered handwarmer. The lapels have exposed snaps, while the collar has concealed ones. The sleeves zip with Serval zippers, while the main is a large gauge Talon. There is a zipper on the collar, presumably for a zip-on mouton collar. The front of the jacket has an attached belt. It has a yoked back, bi-swing shoulders, and spotwork on the kidney panel. Pocket flaps are lined with black corduroy. The coat has a quilted red lining, with black corduroy trim on the pockets and the hem.

Chest (pit to pit): 23″ (doubled = 46″)
Shoulder to Shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″
Length: 23-1/2″

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