1940s Albert Richard Horsehide bomber jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281606438407
This vintage jacket was made in the late 1940s by Fried-Ostermann under their Albert Richard Sportswear label. It is made of brown leather, which, though not labeled on the jacket as such, is called out in advertisements for this model as “Superior horsehide”. The jacket has a mouton collar, called “beavertex” by Albert Richard ads, handwarmer pockets and a zipped breast pocket. The main zipper is a Talon of mid 1940s manufacture, with a square cornered slider and Talon marked U shaped stopbox.
Chest (pit to pit): 20-1/2″ (doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-1/2″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 23-1/2″

A bit on the history of Albert Richard:
Fried-Ostermann was founded c.1902 as a glove manufacturer. They bought out their competitor, Price Gloves, and relocated production of that company’s products to their original factory, located at 617-645 Reed Street, Milwaukee, WI. By 1915, the company had gained a partner, and was known as the Fried, Ostermann, Meyer Co, but that looks to only have lasted until 1917. As the company grew, they relocated to 1645 S. 2nd Street, Milwaukee, WI. Fried-Ostermann diversified out of gloves and into outerwear in the late 1920s with the formation of a new division of the company, called Albert Richard. The leather jackets, mackinaws, overcoats and sportswear produced by Albert Richard would soon come to eclipse the glove-making side of the company. Pre-war advertising stressed health and sports, with endorsements from college football players. These ads also talk about bringing items of clothing which were previously thought of as workwear, like mackinaws and leather jackets, into the realm of ordinary streetwear, citing their comfort and durability. During WWII, the Albert Richard factory made A-2 (contract AC 23383), M-422A (contract 1406A), M444A and M445A flight jackets under the name of their parent company, Fried-Ostermann. They advertised leather jackets, overcoats and sportswear heavily during WWII, giving their jackets model names like the “Spitfire” and the “Meteor”. During the war, the company gave away wall-sized posters showing a range of american military airplanes. 850 workers were employed by Albert Richard in 1946, with plans to hire another 400. The company was one of the first to use fiberglass insulation in coats, a technology borrowed from b-29 bombers. Sheepskin collared “storm coats” became a signature model after the war. President of Fried-Ostermann, Richard Fried, sold their Albert Richard Division to the Drybak corporation of Binghampton, NY in late 1952. Drybak, a maker of canvas hunting clothing was looking to diversify their line. In the deal, they got the licensing, branding, patterns, dealership network, but other than the Vice President and designer for Albert Richard, all of the employees and equipment stayed at the plant in Milwaukee. Fried-Osterman re-focused the attention of their plant on the production of gloves, and on producing leather jackets under house labels for mail order and department stores. Starting in 1953, under Drybak’s ownership, Albert Richard clothing was once again produced, this time under contract at a factory in New Jersey, which Drybak declined to name. The plan at that time was to have production moved to New York by 1954. Labels were changed in this period to read “Albert Richard by Drybak”. In 1955, Drybak acquired the Martin Mfg. Co. in Martin, TN. They closed their Binghamton operations in that same year and relocated their hunting clothing manufacturing and their Albert Richard division to the Tennessee plant to take advantage of the lower labor costs in the south.

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Allen Blanket stripe western jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281606483003
This vintage jacket was made in the 1950 by the Allen Manufacturing Company of Denver Colorado (western made for westerners for over half a century). The jacket is made from camel colored wool blanket material, with a brown and turquoise striped pattern The jacket has a three button front, with peak lapels, handwarmer pockets concealed in pleats, flapped hip pockets, and fancy yokes front and back. It has a full quilted lining.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″
-Shoulder to shoulder: 17-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 32-1/2″

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1940s gabardine half-belt jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271783149533
This vintage jacket was made in the mid-late 1940s. It is gabardine, made in a waist length utility jacket style, with a half-belt back with a center pleat, straight yoke and side adjuster buckles. The jacket has a Talon main zipper, with a square cornered slider and U shaped Talon stopbox, which was produced in the immediate post-war years. The jacket is fully lined, and does not have a label.

Chest (pit to pit): 21-1/2″ (doubled = 43″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 24-1/2″

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Famous D-Pocket motorcycle jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281606876377
This vintage jacket was made in Canada by “Famous”. It is strongly reminiscent of the also Canadian-produced Brimaco D-Pocket motorcycle jacket, which was in turn inspired by the Design of Harley Davidson’s “Cycle Champ” D-Pocket. So although this one was produced in the 1960s, the design and detailing go back to the 1940s. The jacket has a map pocket with sub cigarette pocket, mirrored by a larger patch pocket on the other side of the asymmetrical zipper. The jacket has zipped cuffs with 1930s-1940s style cuff detailing. It has a plaid lining, and a Canadian produced (left tracked) Acme zipper.

Chest (pit to pit):24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23″
Length (base of collar to hem): 22″

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Georgetown Leather Design half-belt leather jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271771686941
This vintage leather jacket was made by Georgetown Leather Design. This was made in the late 1960s in the early days of Georgetown Leather Design, a high-end DC area leather company, before they opened their other area locations in the early 1970s and changed their label. The jacket is made in a half-belt cossack style, popular from about 1935 to the late 1950s. By the 1960s, most manufacturers producing this silhouette had changed the dimensions and detailing, however this one plays it completely straight, and other than the label and quilted lining, it could easily pass for one made nearly 30 years prior. It is made in heavy leather, probably steerhide, with a wonderful patina. The main zip is a brass Talon, as is the pocket zipper. The jacket has scaloped cuffs, a belted back, bi-swing shoulders, and a short, trim cut.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 18-1/2″
Waist: 19″ (doubled = 38″)
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff):21-3/4″
Length (base of collar to hem): 23-3/8″

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1950s Aero Wesco hunting jacket

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271773064045
This vintage mackinaw coat was made by the Aero Brand from wool from the Wesco Wool Pullery of Ellensburg, Washington. The jacket is a double mackinaw, with caped shoulders and double sleeves. It is made of heavy red and black plaid wool, with a plaid lining. The label has a four engined prop plane logo, which appears to be an early 1950s model. The jacket has snapped pockets and an internal game pocket, accessible through snapped vertical flaps on the side seams. The snaps are figural, with the image of the Spirit of St. Louis.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 25″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24″
Length (base of collar to hem): 29″

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1930s German sleeved leather vest

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281596561896
This vintage jacket is made in a sleeved waistcoat style, with a five button front, turnback lapels, and four flapped pockets. It has a belted back and snap cuffs. The style of snaps used are typical of German manufactured leather jackets. It is fully lined, and is tagged a German size 54, which is equivalent to a US size 44. With a 45″ chest, I would say this would best fit a size 40-42

Chest (pit to pit): 22-1/2″ (doubled =45″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 27″
Length (base of collar to hem): 21″

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