1950 JC Higgins hunting coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281304264630
This vintage coat was made in the early 1950s for Sears. It was sold under the JC Higgins label. It is made from heavy red and black plaid mackinaw cloth. There are handwarmer pockets and flapped cargo pockets. There is a game pouch on the back. The coat is lined in a different plaid, with rayon linings in the sleeves. This model can be seen in the page from the 1950 Sears catalog below. This model goes back with few changes to the 1930s, but earlier models had patch cargo pockets.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 23-1/2″
Length (Base of collar to hem): 29″

 photo IMG_0289.jpg

 photo IMG_0290.jpg

 photo IMG_0291-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0292.jpg

 photo IMG_0293.jpg

 photo IMG_0294.jpg

 photo 195001-4.jpg

1930s Brewster Mackinaw

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281303524987
This vintage mackinaw coat was made in Camden, Maine by the J.A. Brewster company. The company was founded in the 19th century by Jarvis Adelbert Brewster. The company produced high quality outerwear for the harsh Maine winters, with locations in Camden and Freeport Maine. The LL Bean flagship store would later be built at the site of Brewster’s Freeport location. Brewster produced the first run of red wool outdoorsman’s shirts for the Boy Scouts in the 1940s.

This coat was made in the late 1930s. The style is pure function, with an oversized collar to block out harsh winter winds. A throat latch / chinstrap makes sure it stays snug when up. The coat is double breasted, with handwarmer pockets on the chest and patch pockets on the hips. As was the style up through the 1930s, this coat is unlined. To make up for the lack of lining and still retain warmth, these early coats were made of super thick wool. After WWII, when lighter weight coats began to be more popular, quilted linings made up for the lower quality of the shell. This one has some of the thickest wool I’ve seen on this type of coat. The tag position is consistent with the dating- later coats by this maker generally had the tag on the inside by the collar.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″ (doubled = 44″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (collar to hem): 30″

 photo IMG_0387.jpg

 photo IMG_0392.jpg

 photo IMG_0388.jpg

 photo IMG_0390.jpg

 photo IMG_0391.jpg

 photo IMG_0070.jpg

 photo IMG_0071.jpg

WWI US Navy Peacoat repro

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271423315528
This peacoat was made by Ralph Lauren and is a reproduction of the model worn in WWI. It has a ten button front, with both handwarmer and flapped cargo pockets. There is a short vent in the rear. The pockets are lined in corduroy. Buttons are reproductions of the 13 star buttons used on WWI coats, with the addition of the RL. The coat is fully lined, with two interior pockets.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length: 32″

 photo IMG_0003-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0004-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0005-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0006-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0008.jpg

 photo IMG_0012-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0013-1.jpg

Early 1930s Woolrich 503 Mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271423336178
This vintage hunting coat was made in Woolrich, Pennsylvania in the early 1930s by John Rich / Woolrich Woolen Mills. The 503 style hunting coat as been around with relatively few changes for the better part of a century, but the details make it easy to date. This is the earliest version of this coat I have seen.

While many Woolrich labels look relatively similar in isolation, the company changed their design every few years. This label was used in the very early 1930s. See the dating guide I have put together at the end of the auction. The snaps in this coat are by United Carr, and are a design only used from about 1930-1934. The top of the snap, with its line design, was used by Woolrich until about 1940. They switched to plain headed snaps during WWII, then to Woolrich branded snaps after the war. These early coats have asymmetrical breast pockets, while starting in the late 1950s, Woolrich switched to matching breast pockets. The brown buttons on this early coat are nicer than the red bakelite buttons which Woolrich began to use in the mid 1930s, which has a tendency to craze and crack over time.

Chest (pit to pit): 25″
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 28″

 photo IMG_0014-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0016-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0030.jpg

 photo IMG_0031.jpg

 photo IMG_0017-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0023-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0025-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0033-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0034-1.jpg

 photo IMG_0035-1.jpg

 photo sheep.jpg

 photo snaps.jpg

1930s Milcraft Clothes belted overcoat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281279971937
This vintage overcoat was made in the mid 1930s by Milcraft Clothes of St. Paul, Minnesota. It is double breasted, with a full belt, patch pockets, cuffed sleeves, a breast pocket, and a fancy yoked, pleated back. As is typical of overcoats of this period, it is half-lined. Unfortunately, there are no union tags or tailor’s tags, but the particular details, style of the Millcraft label, and style and cut of the coat allow for fairly close dating. Pocket square not included.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26-1/2″
Length: 49″

 photo IMG_0088.jpg

 photo IMG_0089.jpg

 photo IMG_0091.jpg

 photo IMG_0093.jpg

 photo IMG_0098.jpg

 photo IMG_0099.jpg

 photo IMG_0100.jpg

 photo IMG_0103.jpg

 photo IMG_0104.jpg

 photo IMG_0102.jpg

1930s m1926 army mackinaw coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281272498743
This vintage mackinaw was made in the 1930s for the US Army. This coat is lined with Earl-Glo rayon, a material which hit the market in 1927. This label is consistent with the ones used by Earl-Glo in the early 1930s. These pre-war mackinaws are much rarer than their WWII issued counterparts, and were worn as part of the work uniform by the Civilian Conservation Corps.
The coat is unlined, a defining feature of the pre-war pattern. This is also typical of the civilian work mackinaws from which this design descended. The small lining panel at the collar and the seam tape is made of the aforementioned Earl-Glo rayon. The coat is double breasted, with a shawl collar. It has a buttoned belt and buttoned adjuster tabs on the sleeves.

Chest (pit to pit): 22″
Shoulder to shoulder: 18″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 32″

 photo IMG_1496.jpg

 photo IMG_1497.jpg

 photo IMG_1498.jpg

 photo IMG_1499.jpg

 photo IMG_1500.jpg

 photo IMG_1501.jpg

 photo IMG_1505.jpg

 photo IMG_1510.jpg

 photo IMG_1511.jpg

 photo IMG_1512.jpg

 photo earlglorayon.jpg

1960s Hudson’s Bay Point Blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271404687198
This vintage coat was made in the early 1960s by the Hudson’s Bay Company from their iconic multi-stripe point blankets. It is their “Olympic” model, a belted, double breasted style with tab adjusters at the wrists, handwarmer pockets at the chest and patch pockets on the hips. The style was made, essentially unchanged, since the 1920s. Whereas some blanket mackinaws of this style were made using the Hudson’s Bay fabric by other manufacturers, this one was made and sold by Hudson’s Bay themselves. This is the same style and era as was worn by the Canadian Olympic team at the 1964 Innsbruck Winter Olympic games. The stripes on this one are inverted from what most are – usually you see the indigo stripe on the bottom. However, even looking at the photos of the Canadian Olympic team all wearing matching versions of this coat, a percentage have this rarer flipped design. The position of the stripes relative to the features of the coats differ in nearly every coat in those pictures as well. I suppose each cutter had their own way of positioning the pattern. The coat is fully lined, which, along with the particular style of label, distinguish it from earlier manufacture coats.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 26″
Length (base of collar to hem): 35″

 photo IMG_7538.jpg

 photo IMG_7539.jpg

 photo IMG_7540.jpg

 photo IMG_7542.jpg

 photo IMG_7543.jpg

 photo IMG_7544.jpg

 photo IMG_7545.jpg

1941 Jacob Siegel Co. Army Mackinaw

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281268073559
This vintage Officer’s Short Overcoat / Shawl Collar Mackinaw was made in 1941 by the Jacob Siegel Company under contract for the US Army. This style coat was a direct descendant of the shawl collar workwear mackinaws of the 1910s-1930s, and from the m-1926 mackinaw worn by the Army and the Civilian Conservation Corps before the war. It is a double breasted style, with a broad shawl collar, epaulettes, and a belted waist. The coat is fully lined with an interior breast pocket. There are stitch marks on the sleeves from a six pointed star patch and a round patch.

Chest (pit to pit): 21″ (doubled = 42″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 17-1/2″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 25″
Length (base of collar to hem): 32″

 photo IMG_0189.jpg

 photo IMG_0190.jpg

 photo IMG_0192.jpg

 photo IMG_0193.jpg

 photo IMG_0194.jpg

 photo IMG_0196.jpg

 photo IMG_0198.jpg

1920s Drybak hunting coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/271403958670
This vintage hunting jacket was made in the late 1920s or 1930s. From the details, it’s likely this coat was made by Drybak. The coat is made of densely woven brown canvas, with a corduroy collar and cuffs. There are handwarmer pockets, cargo pockets and closed bottom shell loops. The shoulders are reinforced, and there is an internal buttoned game pouch. These unlined game pockets are typical of the earlier production hunting jackets. Models from the 1930s and on generally had some sort of waterproof lining. The arm panel forms a gusset for a greater range of motion. The underarms have four ventilation grommets each.

Chest (pit to pit): 26″ (doubled = 52″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 20″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 22″
Length (base of collar to hem): 27″

 photo IMG_0177.jpg

 photo IMG_0179.jpg

 photo IMG_0180.jpg

 photo IMG_0181.jpg

 photo IMG_0182.jpg

 photo IMG_0185.jpg

 photo IMG_0186.jpg

 photo IMG_0187.jpg

 photo IMG_0188.jpg

1940s green Maine Guide blanket coat

http://www.ebay.com/itm/281267936264
This vintage coat was made by Congress Sportswear under the “Maine Guide” label just after the end of WWII. The coat is made from green wool blanket fabric, in a four pocket, zipper front style. The zipper is of the mid to late 1940s design, with a square cornered puller, and a “Talon” marked stopbox. The tag is of Maine Guide’s pre-1947 design. The coat is mostly unlined save for the shoulders. It has shirt style cuffs.

Maine Guide was known for its elaborate Hudson’s Bay point blanket cots. This one is simplified and does not bear the HBC label, but putting it side by side with the other green Maine Guide coat I have currently, the two are nearly identical. Maine Guide made heavy use of the black stripe portion of their blankets for trim. I wouldn’t be surprised if they had this slightly simplified line to make use of the surplus background blanket wool.

Chest (pit to pit): 24″ (doubled = 48″)
Shoulder to shoulder: 19″
Sleeve (shoulder to cuff): 24-1/2″
Length (base of collar to hem): 30″

 photo IMG_0254.jpg

 photo IMG_0255.jpg

 photo IMG_0257.jpg

 photo IMG_0259.jpg

 photo IMG_0260.jpg

 photo IMG_0261.jpg